Monthly Archives: August 2013

In This Case: Highlighting Women Sculptors

In This Case: Highlighting Women Sculptors

My fellow summer intern, Emilie Reed, wrote a great blog post on women sculptors in the American Art Museum’s Luce Center. The Luce Center is an on-site, visible storage facility that contains more than 3000 works from the museum’s permanent collection, quadrupling the number of objects on view! There are a number of incredible women artists in the collection including Louise Nevelson, Bessie Stough Callender, Yuriko Yamaguchi, and more. Click over to learn more about these American women sculptors.

Bessie Stough Callender, Antelope, 1929, black belgian marble, Smithsonian American Art Museum

Bessie Stough Callender, Antelope, 1929, black belgian marble, 16″x12″x24″, Smithsonian American Art Museum

Yuriko Yamaguchi, Reach Out #3, 1989, natural, stained and painted wood, 34"x72.5"x 3", Smithsonian American Art Museum

Yuriko Yamaguchi, Reach Out #3, 1989, natural, stained and painted wood, 34″x72.5″x 3″, Smithsonian American Art Museum

Louise Nevelson, Night Leaf, 1969, plexiglas, 12.75"x12.75"x2.25", Smithsonian American Art Museum

Louise Nevelson, Night Leaf, 1969, plexiglas, 12.75″x12.75″x2.25″, Smithsonian American Art Museum

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Female Gaze Friday: Sylvia Sleigh’s “At The Turkish Bath”

Representations of the male figure in art are far less common than works depicting women. A long history of straight men dominating the art world has led to many images of winsome women, but fewer of beautiful men (I’ve written on this subject before; if you’d like to read more about the lack of male figures in art check it out here).

Every Female Gaze Friday I will post a woman-created work of art depicting a man—one small act to reverse the male gaze! Not all images will be provocative, many will be nonsexual or even disturbing. Hopefully this will be a way of learning more about women artists (as well as looking at dudes)!

This week’s piece is At the Turkish Bath by feminist painter Sylvia Sleigh:

Sylvia Sleigh, At The Turkish Bath, 1976, oil on canvas, 76"x100"

Sylvia Sleigh, At The Turkish Bath, 1976, oil on canvas, 76″x100″

Notably active in the 1970s, Sleigh created works that reversed artistic tradition by depicting men in poses associated with women (This seems like an excellent moment to link to “What If the Male Avengers Posed Like the Female Ones?“). In fact, this piece references Ingres’s 1862 painting The Turkish Bath:

Jean-Auguste-Dominique Ingres, The Turkish Bath, 1862, oil on wood, 43"x43"

Jean-Auguste-Dominique Ingres, The Turkish Bath, 1862, oil on wood, 43″x43″

At the Turkish Bath is the first Sleigh piece I’d ever seen and is still on view at the University of Chicago’s Smart Museum of Art. Sleigh works her husband into the painting as the reclining man.

As a bonus piece for Female Gaze Friday, we have Sleigh’s work Philip Golub Reclining:

Sylvia Sleigh, Philip Golub Reclining, 1971

Sylvia Sleigh, Philip Golub Reclining, 1971

This painting is a gender-reversed version of the Rokeby Venus by Velázquez. It’s also an intriguing example of a work representing a clothed female artist and a nude male model (I’ve written about the trend of clothed male artists and nude female models before).

Check back on Fridays for more images of men by women. And feel free to suggest works of art or artists in the comments!

Take a look at our previous Female Gaze Friday: Sarah Faux’s Man in Bed.

 

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The Billfold: A Conversation With an Artist/Nonprofit Worker About Her Money

The Billfold: A Conversation With an Artist/Nonprofit Worker About Her Money

The Billfold (a funny and readable site about money-management) interviewed an artist and nonprofit worker about her finances. They covered everything from student debt and spending habits to studio rent and familial contributions. Margaret, the interviewee, works at a nonprofit to support her career as a sculptor and candidly discusses how she manages money. It’s eye-opening to see how she balances her work and her finances.

As a soon-to-be art graduate I worry about career choices and about money. This addressed so many of my questions and makes it clear that EVERYONE worries about these things. If you’re an aspiring artist or current art student I would recommend this as a must read!

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Linda Adele Goodine at Chicago’s Gallery 19

Chicago readers should visit Gallery 19’s exhibit The Construction Of featuring feminist artist Linda Adele Goodine, who works with photography, video, and performance art.

Linda Adele Goodine, Wisdom Tooth, 2010, polyflex photographic print

Linda Adele Goodine, Wisdom Tooth, polyflex photographic print

Linda Adele Goodine, Woolf, polyflex photographic print

Linda Adele Goodine, Woolf, polyflex photographic print

Goodine’s photographs in The Construction Of focus on her liberation from the feminine mystique. She spits teeth and wishbones into a pile resting next to an animal carcass, creating an image in which she ferociously rejects the restricting expectations of her gender. You can see the complete set of images from her Winter Tales series here.

Goodine also creates environmental art, focusing on endangered areas in New Zealand and the Florida Everglades. These series are full of beautiful color and highlight the transitions these spaces are undergoing while showing local wildlife.

Take a look at Gallery 19’s website or read a great review of the show (and see Antonio J. Martinez’s contrasting hyper-masculine photography) over at Newcity Art. The Construction Of runs until September 19th and is located at 1967 1/2 W Montrose Ave. Check it out!

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Female Gaze Friday: Sarah Faux’s “Man in Bed”

Representations of the male figure in art are far less common than works depicting women. A long history of straight men dominating the art world has led to many images of winsome women, but fewer of beautiful men (I’ve written on this subject before; if you’d like to read more about the lack of male figures in art check it out here).

Every Female Gaze Friday I will post a woman-created work of art depicting a man—one small act to reverse the male gaze! Not all images will be provocative, many will be nonsexual or even disturbing. Hopefully this will be a way of learning more about women artists (as well as looking at dudes)!

This week’s piece is Man in Bed by contemporary painter Sarah Faux:

Sarah Faux, Man in Bed, 2012, oil and spray paint on canvas, 38 x 42

Sarah Faux, Man in Bed, 2012, oil and spray paint on canvas, 38 x 42

Critics have referred to Faux as a New Casualist (a movement marked by the “studied, passive-aggressive incompleteness to much of the most interesting abstract work that painters are making today.”) and compare her works to those of Jean Dubuffet and Jean-Michel Basquiat. Faux’s paintings are a mix of abstraction and representation; her work is generally figurative but undefined.

Faux is one of the artists at Woman Made Gallery’s Slippery Slope exhibit and her work, Man in Bed, is currently exhibited there. You can see more of Faux’s work on her website.

Check back on Fridays for more images of men by women. And feel free to suggest works of art or artists in the comments!

Take a look at our previous Female Gaze Friday: Nancy Grossman’s Male Figure.

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Female Gaze Friday: Nancy Grossman’s “Male Figure”

Representations of the male figure in art are far less common than works depicting women. A long history of straight men dominating the art world has led to many images of winsome women, but fewer of beautiful men (I’ve written on this subject before; if you’d like to read more about the lack of male figures in art check it out here).

Every Female Gaze Friday I will post a woman-created work of art depicting a man—one small act to reverse the male gaze! Not all images will be provocative, many will be nonsexual or even disturbing. Hopefully this will be a way of learning more about women artists (as well as looking at dudes)!

This week’s image is Male Figure by Nancy Grossman:

Nancy Grossman, Male Figure, 1971, wood, leather, and metal, 68 inches high, The Israel Museum, Jerusalem, gift of Joseph H. Hazen, New York, to the American Friends of the Israel Museum

Nancy Grossman, Male Figure, 1971, wood, leather, and metal, 68 inches high, The Israel Museum, Jerusalem, gift of Joseph H. Hazen, New York, to the American Friends of the Israel Museum

Grossman is well-known for her 1960s sculptures of heads covered with bondage gear. Although her figures present as male, at times she refers to them as self portraits which lends an interesting twist to the gendering of her work. You can learn more about Grossman and see more of her art here.

Check back on Fridays for more images of men by women. And feel free to suggest works of art or artists in the comments!

Check out our previous Female Gaze Friday: Isabel Rocamora

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Melissa Huang: Updated Portfolio

To all of my fellow artists and art enthusiasts: I’ve done some portfolio restructuring and now my artwork is separated into the easy to peruse categories of painting, drawing, sculpture, and printmaking. Check it out here!

Melissa (2012)

Melissa, 2012, oil on canvas, 36″x48″

Peter, 2012, oil on canvas, 36"x48"

Peter, 2012, oil on canvas, 36″x48″

Feel free to contact me (mah5588@rit.edu) if you’re interested in purchasing a piece, commissioning a portrait, or if you’re just plain curious about one of the works. Thanks, and feel free to share your thoughts in the comments!

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Interview with Peace Bound: Portraits for Non-Violence

Woman Made Gallery interviewed Emma Redden and Jeffrey From about their project “Peace Bound”, in which they underwent a six-week, 10,000 mile road trip through the US asking people they encountered, “Why is it important to support victims of domestic violence?”. It’s an incredible project and interview. Check it out! You can see more of their project here.

WOMAN MADE GALLERY

Emma Redden and Jeffrey From are two artistic juniors at Vassar College in Poughkeepsie, NY who have just recently concluded a six-week, 10,000 mile road trip across the United States, asking people one question: “Why is it important to support victims of domestic violence?” The two received the Davis Foundation’s “100 Projects for Peace” grant to implement their project, which involved collecting photographs and statements from members of the public as well as employees from a variety of domestic violence service centers. Their blog is an online collection of the portraits they’ve gathered along the way, which they plan to publish in a book along with excerpts from selected interviews. They hope that the book will become an artistic source of support, solidarity, and strength for individuals whose lives have been affected by domestic violence in any respect, and perhaps encourage others to recognize and end cycles of…

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Female Gaze Friday: Isabel Rocamora’s “Body of War”

Representations of the male figure in art are far less common than works depicting women. A long history of straight men dominating the art world has led to many images of winsome women, but fewer of beautiful men (I’ve written on this subject before; if you’d like to read more about the lack of male figures in art check it out here).

Because of this, I’d like to introduce Female Gaze Friday! Every Friday I will post a woman-created work of art depicting a man—one small act to reverse the male gaze! Not all images will be provocative, many will be nonsexual or even disturbing. Hopefully this will be a way of learning more about women artists (as well as looking at dudes)!

Kicking off Female Gaze Friday is Body of War by Isabel Rocamora. I was lucky enough to see her work during my time in Florence at the Palazzo Strozzi as part of an exhibit titled, An Idea of Beauty. Here is a quick clip of Rocamora’s work:

You can see the artist speak about Body of War here. Skip to 2:32 to watch the entire piece—it’s definitely worth it! The graceful movement of the figures make an incredible contrast with the violence of war.

Check back on Fridays for more images of men by women. And feel free to suggest works of art or artists in the comments!

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Marina Abramović and Lady Gaga Collaborate

Lady Gaga spent a weekend studying under Marina Abramović—the grandmother of performance art. Some art critics think this signals the end, but I think it’s great. The art scene is changing and artists have to change with it. In my opinion, Lady Gaga is an artist whose stunts are wide-reaching performance pieces for a younger generation. And if Abramović wants to mentor a younger artist, who am I to judge?

Take a look at The Abramović Method Practiced by Lady Gaga:

Gaga and Abramović’s video is part of the Marina Abramović Institute’s Kickstarter campaign. Their goal is to fund a $20 million living museum in Hudson, New York. Since the new video on Wednesday, the institute has raised $70,000 (out of $250,000 raised since July).

You can read more about their collaboration here and here.

What do you think? Is this a way for Abramović to pander to the masses or an innovative collaboration between artists? Share your thoughts in the comments.

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